Sensory Museum

system of display

Museum artefacts and cognitive narratives

 

 

Since the British Museum (London’s first public museum) opened to the public in 1759, the systems used to display objects in museums remain largely unchanged. Objects generally continue to be tagged, dated, and positioned on plinths or in glass cases, and visitors are seldom invited to touch them. The emphasis is upon visual engagement only, and a profound understanding of the significance of each object is seldom achieved.

 

More recently however, display culture is beginning to evolve due to technological shifts and social trends, prompting museums to reconsider how the public engage – physically and psychologically – with historical content.
For many, a museum should be a place where social exchanges can be held and experiences can be shared, rather than simply a space for viewing cabinets or touching screens. The museum of the future should therefore be a space where the narrative of objects is reimagined through new systems that arouse intense and complex sensory experiences, revealing new narratives.

 

This design proposal involved carving a narrative route across, beneath and outside of the Imperial War Museum building that spatially curates carefully selected World War II artefacts. Rather than simply display these artefacts, this project proposes to use the material qualities and historic narratives of each artefact to directly inform the design attributes of a series of immersive interior spaces, enabling visitors to have a richer and more meaningful cognitive experience of each object.

 

 

Shortlisted at RCA Head of Programme Prize, Interiors, 2017

In the museum, artefacts are exhibited as evidence of history, to memorialise, remember, and imagine the moment. Audiences learn history by looking at artefacts, reading scripts, watching images, and imagining or recalling those moments. This is all a museum function based on the information. Sensory museums do not aim to convey information. The combination of indirect experiences such as colour, light, smell, sound, touch, and humidity is a museum of intense experience that stimulates imagination and acts intuitively on emotions.

The audience’s journey has been designed linearly to experience a continuous flow of space arranged over time. The change of emotions according to the flow of space gradually accumulates and gradually increases the immersion of the audience.

The ground and building are evidence of the history. Sensory space freely interferes with it, to celebrate their value and potential.

Each space is created based on each object and is independent and does not interfere. The whole journey made through several stages with multiple levels, giving the audience a dramatic experience.

Linear circulation freely interferes with the plane and elevation of space.

A sensory museum is a real & virtual space that works in sync with a wearable device. The wearable device delivers precise personal experiences to each sense based on location data from each space. Sensory experiences, such as temperature, humidity, wind, sound, smell, and haptic feedback, convey different stories based on personal experience. Thus, even in the same space, the experience of each audience is very individual and independent.

The site has a historical value itself. The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.

The journey starts and ends up on the bomb dropped spots of World War 2. Sensory spaces are freely interfering the ground and architecture.